Month: August 2015

Prom and Prejudice, by Elizabeth Eulberg

This doesn’t have the stakes of the original, but it is a lightweight, delightful homage to Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. The private schools of Longbourn (for girls) and Pemberly (for boys)– see what she did there?–pair their well-to-do students up every year for a no-holds-barred prom to end all proms. But scholarship student Lizzie Bennett has nothing but contempt for the rich kids who mock her relative poverty and none is worse than the stuck-up Will Darcy. Great fun.

Grift, by Jason Mosberg

A haunting story of a crew of teen con artists in Las Vegas, all mentored by their own Fagan, an older con artist, whose goal is to keep them from getting arrested.And they are all successful at what they do, until one day their crimes catch up with them, and they have to pull off the biggest con of all. Clearly deeply researched, this book will certainly alert you to MANY ways to lose your money in Vegas beyond your gambling. This book feels like a YA story, but since our heroine, Piper, cons men who think she’s a prostitute, and for overall amorality, I recommend it for 17 and up.

Note: I was given a free e-copy of this book in the hopes that I would review it.

The Madman’s Daughter, by Megan Shepherd

A terrific gothic take on Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau. When 16-year-old Juliet Moreau decides to leave her work as a servant in Victorian London and discover the truth about her father, a brilliant surgeon who was exiled in disgrace, she take a freighter with her father’s handsome assistant, Montgomery, to discover a world beyond anything she can imagine. Creepy and creative, for older teens only.